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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
talk about that, or ray. >> it's important to note that we are the supporting effort to cal fire and we get called in when they are basically out of assets. we are working for cal fire, they are the incident commanders, we follow their coordination, typically we're the last ones in and the first ones out. we do have an on-going relationship with cal fire, i'm in contact with cal fire all the time. we have good situational awareness what's going on in the state of california. they normally put us in an alert stat us so we're prepared to respond in an attack mode. i don't often work with chief chaney in southern california, about a month ago we had 9 aircraft at our peak working fires throughout northern california if that answers your question. >> any other responses? >> i wanted to touch -- can you hear me now? i wanted to touch on that last topic as far as the command control because what we have here in the marine corps is similar to the navy. we have the installation, the regional installation command and also partners with the operational foresite. we allow the operational fo
authority. with respect to cal fire, we are the third largest fire department in the nation and the largest in california with over 7,000 uniformed employees. we also have the largest aerial fire fighting nreed in the world. so typically when a large disaster type fire occurs, we are usually rendering aid, not asking for aid. so when we get into a situation when we get to that level, what we call mega fires is the new term we're using, we're reach a certain draw down level or certain criteria, we reach out to our military coordinators, hence our agreement with the third nraet and the one map locally in san francisco under ir cal fire prides itself on a statistic that we contain 97 percent of all wild fires in california with 10 acres or less and we do this with an aggressive report of incidents, even with a 911 call of smoepk with land, air and ground attack. once fires become to a large enough scale we call mue tour aid, california lass a great mue tour aid system. i think it's looked at nationally because we have souch excellent cooperation with our cooperating agencies. once it reac
object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in t
with cal fire itself with the objective being the fire itself. those work out for us here and we can go ahead and use those skills forward as well. thank you very much, we appreciate the opportunity. >> thank you, i'd like to thank our panelists and open it up to our group for any questions of our panelists today. yes, sir, secretary. >> there are a lot of things you can do in a forest that tend to make it easier it fight a fire like most importantly burning off the fuel during the wet season so there's less for the fire to feed on. to what extent in cal fire and all your other things do you encourage people to do things in their forest when you don't have a fire that make it easier and more effective in fighting the fire? >> it's an excellent question, sir. we spend a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation management program in cal fire, we have a robust program throughout the state where we are conducting burning operations and vegetation management with prieflt ranch owners
catalogs designed just like fire scope and cal fire in which we have built strike teams from our utilities, strike teams from water companies. they simply make a call and tell us we need 10, 12, 15, it's our obligation to put that together and get it to them. they are worried about the incident in their jurisdiction which they have to correct. it's our responsibility to reach bond those borders as their extension to bring in the reserves that they need to maintain that kaupblt newt of operation and then where we function through the state utility operations center and the state operations center to make sure that we have that kind of access and that kind of assistance. we need caltrans, we're going to need chp, we're going to need cal fire, we need dwr, they are invested in restoring their critical infrastructure and it's our responsibility to reach across those lines to get that kind of access to keep that kind of restoration underway. >> thank you. mr. brig. >> in terms of establishing standards for resill yepbs, absolutely, we have done that. again as i mentioned earlier, to get our
of lessons learned being applied. first to my left, ray chaney, cal fire incident battle xwrupb chief. to his left, colonel laura yeager, 40th combat aviation brigade. to her left, commander steve everett, to his left lieutenant colonel dana, marine corps installation west. thank you. let me go ahead and start off by talking a little bit and just going back over some of the discussions yesterday that i think are going to play into this discussion. we had vice admiral beeman talk a little bit yesterday about capabilities and vice admiral zunkoff talked about partnerships, unity of effort, unity of command. mayor lee talked about dod efforts, expertise, community efforts and as we go into all those discussions today you will see best practices applied during the 10 years from those fires. i have the pleasure of working for administrator fuget in fema headquarters. fema's role is to coordinate response between state and local governments and his focus, his direction to us really comes down it 3 things. he asks us to always plan for the worst case, the maximum of the maximums and it'
's enlightening character were evident when we were undergrads at cal. i would like to share examples. first of all we will start superficially on the topic of fashion. chris like many of our pledge class was from piedmont. i recall thinking what is up with piedmont. the khakis, penny loafers and button-down shirts? chris lived in the room across from mine. seemed he had adopted this as his uniform. but in hindsight i can see he was offering his own form of enlightenment. he was guiding us away from the dark time known as the disco era. [ laughter] who knew that chris would work his timeless style for the next 34 years. look at the effect on me, who is wearing the button-down now that. was the first life lesson from chris. stick with the classics, they won't go out of style. that said, my wife has gently advised me the definition of a classic look does not extend to certain flannel shirts from 1982. our next topic on the less sons that we learned from chris back then involve culture. this is beyond the stereotypical fraternity life experience, because i was lucky enough to live with chris a
of public transportation that even cal train named a loco motor after jackie spear. please welcome congress woman jackie spear. >> thank you mr. mayor. thank you secretary lahood. thank you to the incredible leadership, senator feinstein, nancy pelosi and mayor lee and the board of supervisors to chairman nol an from the sfmta. i am on pins and needles. do we have anything else to report? it's still at the same point we think they're in commercials. i am reminded from the song from "top gun" "take my breath away" and $942 million takes my breath away and i think to mayor lee for that amount i think we should get a leather flight jacket to thank mr. lahood for the great gift to our great city. the new money that is going to be used here is going to create 1,000 new jobs before the end of the year with many more jobs to come after that. that is something to applaud. thank you again secretary lahood for that. this is one point 7 miles very similar to the length of the golden gate bridge when 75 years ago that was going to be built and little did we know what that bridge would bring to
of examples from the uc berkeley archives in that regard. his typewriter. chris arrived at cal with a beautiful, fancy electric typewriter, a covetted object in that prelaptop and prepc era. chris decided that beautiful machine was too bulky and didn't like being tethered to an electrical outlet. one day he traded it for a little olivetti manual. he was so proud. he loved the tactile sense of klaking away, which he did well. he created great works. the next topic are shoes. as enlightened members of the ato fraternity, our class came up with an idea to have a great gatsby party every year. this was a major event where we had a band, pond and duck. chris wanted to dress the part and was delighted to find a snazzy pair of gaudy wing tips. he seemed undeterred by the fact these were golf spikes and that even after i mentioned to him that he would literally be cutting a rug if he wore those things, he bought them any way and unscrewed the spikes and danced up a storm. the floors needed refinishing any way. chris was one of the first people i knew in the prestarbucks era who bought
of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new, may be looking for a day, or chatting with friends. the
's degree from cal civil engineer, and six months into my first job as an engineer i decided that that wasn't real where my passion was. so i went back to school, got my masters in education and never turned back. everything i've done has been related to education, even in the classroom or running a nonprofit organization. i've been in executive management leadership for over 30 years now. first as executive director of a start-up of nonprofit. that became eventually a $10 million organization. and eventually i ran for school board and i have been on the school board for 8 years and currently i'm the president. during the eight years i've been able to provide leadership, build consensus and make tough decisions. and because of that now we have the best urban school district in california. our test scores have gone up every single year since i've been on the school board. and, in fact, last year was the first time we started closing the achievement gap, which is not the easiest thing to do for any school district. i can't tell you this right now because it's in bargain, but we know our test
military proprietary systems. so, we can share the common operating picture that we have with cal ema and we've developed the ability to import data from every allied organization whether it's usgs, the law enforcement agencies, fire, weather, what have you, to be able to put it out in layers so we literally can know everything going on. we can see lightning strikes that cause fires, down to the size of a car fire. we're often able to do predictive analysis that exceeds the ability of fire and other agencies and able to call them up because we can see this and we've trained our battle captains that work in our operations center to think ahead and think three moves ahead whether or not an event they see developing is going to cause a trigger that is going to require national guard or other military forces to deploy. >> if i may, i think it's for us, myself as the senior leader in third fleet, it's about information sharing and intelligence fusion and turning that into actionable knowledge. we have a 24/7 maritime operation center as well that we attempt to do that. we do have cnn up, u
for personnel to cal log services and operating system. recommendation 14. what i had stated here requires further analysis but i would say i think we agree that would help departments and identifying resources. i would like to work closely with labor and department heads to understand the best way to move this forward. so one more page is findings and recommendations. let's go to finding number 20. find be number 20. there is no effort to gather and utilize comprehensive and quantitative data to track how ict functions and what i stated for this i personally disagree. while there are efforts to see how they function departments don't have incentive to assist in such efforts. finding number 21. the five year ict plan is not a strategic plan. it doesn't calculate how the changes in the system would impact the cost and i agree with that and ought to be that plan at this time but only current plan of projects. number 22. they are experiencing difficulty in hiring these group of people with skills and i agree and hiring managers with cutting edge experience has been extremely challengin
n car went past me towards the ballpark and the cal train. i told that to the three one one operator and by the time it came back to the embarcadero station after being by the ballpark and the people waiting patiently except for me at the embarcadero station would do well to get on the train much less get a seat. he was a pol gettic and he assured me he noted my call. within five minutes an out bound train came in to the embarcadero station empty. the schedule indicated it would be more than 30 minutes to the next out bound train and by the time this train got to powell street station it was full and more people each stop after. since the three one one operator knew nothing about a problem and meant all those people didn't call because they didn't expect to get any better service. number three, another more recent time i boarded in train at third avenue and the signage said it was only going to church street. i got on and the driver said in a clear voice on a clear pa system that the train would go only to church street. at every stop he informed the new passengers t
. is there emppir cal evidence intrp? >> if we go through september and the switchbacks you have to go through because every one is different, and the relative benefit of the switch back in terms of schedule time -- if you took each of the incidents and walk through them and okay we switch a j line train at 30th and church and had accident at balboa and people ran regular service downtown and each of the incidents we could point to the scheduled benefit was, and you have to look at these things again. these are a recovery technique, so they're not something that we go in and plan everyday and we're going to have 15 -- our target is 15 switchbacks. our target is ten. >> that seems like anecdotal evidence. did you provide the grand jury with empirical evidence? those are the findings here. i am asking about that. >> like i said we don't agree with that particular finding but if you go down, and we provided substantial amount of information, notebooks, discs, but we are happy to go through each of the incidents and took a particular month, and again took september and 182 switchbacks. here's
the uc davis school of law in 2004, following a clerkship with judge cal braise of the united states court of appeals for the second circuit. interest include election law, administrative law, statutory interpretation, constitutional law and property and natural resources law. he is a resident of san francisco's mission district. we are honored to work chris almendorf. [ applause ] >> thank you very much and thank you to all of the candidates who are here today. we're very fortunate to be joined by six candidates and what i hope will soon be seven. all of the candidates have agreed to ask their supporters to be respectful of other candidates and the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i ask you to respect that commitment. every aspect of this forum will be equally fair to all participating candidates. as everyone here knows candidate debates are often limited to latitudinal appears and personal attack. our debate focuses on critical areas of policy disagreement among the leading candidates. so this end the league of women voters of san francisco and the san francisco pu
of transportation near there. the trances bay terminal next to bart, next to cal train this is a great project and has so much commuter friendly things going on there, and as far as i am concerned when it comes to development in san francisco it's got to stop. >> all right. thank you sir. >> there are three parts of the economy, the consumer, the investment and the government. the only reason thing that has grown on a rapid rate is the government. the government gets their revenues through taxation or borrowing money. the problem is the regulations are hurting small businesses. 2/3 of all jobs are created by small business which are considered -- chapter s corporations and less than $250,000 killing all of the regulations and kill the incentive. the government doesn't produce anything. it's the private sector that produces the wealth and the opportunity. get the government off the back through regulations and taxation and you will see the city once again be vibrant. i'm telling you it's taxation and regulations. i have two successful businesses. i would not open another one in san fra
for him and he likes it. the stories are metaphor cal. i don't look at this that this is a man or woman. there are qualities we all have that some of us are in touch with and are not. in our culture we think people should not be people they have be macho and feminine image. every human being inside them has feminine and masculine qualities. one is not good or bad it's a duality you need to be a whole human being in touch of what is going on in society. if everyone danced or got in touch with different sides of them there would be more harmony in the world. yes. >> no, we have a school all over here. i'm talking so. . we have a school 250 students a school show coming up. she will tell you where you can take classes. >> in our class we teach kids from 5 years old to 55 years and older. our guru is 62 and he dances circles around all of us he's been dancing since he was 9. you can all learn and parents and grandfathers and grand mourths can learn, toochlt we have a special men's class and have classes in san francisco. if you have questions there is an address on the card and our e mail
, hadr course, trained with cal fire, take the time to take that training. it's tough to fit it in but it's important to fit it in and it will make us more effective. we did an exercise back in may in preparation for this and developed a pretty detailed concept of operations. we built load plan, timelines, spare parts lists, we really got into the weeds, thinking about the second and third tier effects, so i want my relief to understand that and i want him to know where that plan is so he can pull it right off the shelf if this ever happens and be ready to respond quickly instead of trying to figure this all out when we need to be getting underway. >> i'll boil mine down into just one, and that is i will pass to my relief to continue to support events like this and look for opportunities to continue to learn how we best in the military can integrate with our civilian and federal contemporaries to be prepared for an eventuality that we hope will never come, but we certainly should be prepared for. so the one thing i'm passing on is keep the momentum. >> thank you, all. one other benefit
the candidate's closing statements in reversal fa bet cal order. you have two minutes and our timers will give you the cards and first mr. leno. >> certainly, it is now in california, here in san francisco for the past 35 years. starting small businesses in 1978 and coming into public service in 1998. the 14 years that i have had the elective office have been a rare and privilege opportunity to serve, which i think is to be the best districts of the state of california, and the city and county of san francisco, this past couple of years in the sonoma county as well and going back and representing the west tip as well. and i want to continue to make sure that we have a strong government, strong and effective state government. and i have talked about the governor nans issue, making sure that we let the majority rule so that we don't have the kind of stall mates that we find currently where the minority party can block what the majority wants to do and so we can have the democracy. i make the point that we didn't become the 8th or 9th largest economy in the world by chance. we became so because f
's owned by cal trans and unfortunately there have been some horrific accidents there. i think that -- one of the things i am aware of even in the downtown area -- it's interesting when you go by the mos coney center there are signals to tell pedestrian when is to walk and not to walk but if you go to fourth and mission or fourth and market you don't have those same signals so people are just always walking. i also think -- i know it's not popular. i think we should cite jay walkers. they do in los angeles and i got a ticket 20 years ago and never did it again and i think we need to make the pedestrians aware of the rules and they must respect traffic as well and there needs to be outreach there. >> mr. lagos. >> yes, this is a very interesting question and it affects everybody, and i come from a city originally where the cars are king, los angeles, and one of the reasons i came here because the car isn't king here, but for pedestrians it is a problem, and i support reducing automobile traffic in certain parts of san francisco because i think there are parts of san francisco dangerous fo
and also students and professors from cal poly, san francisco state, and u.c. berkeley, and many more that i couldn't begin to rattle off. i think it's important at the beginning just to acknowledge that the process was very inclusive, a lot of people, and the final plan that is in front of you is a result of a lot of people's input. so, with that, to begin our next section of the presentation, i would like to introduce jim meeko, the chair of the western soma citizens task force. >> thank you very much, and thank you, president fong and commissioners. it's such a pleasure to finally be here at the tail end of this process. i'm glad corey mentioned the bulk of our work was really done between 2005 and 2008, but that's not to imply that we haven't been doing important things since then. but i'll leave it to corey to explain to you why it's taken this long to finally come before you for this final stage of the process. it would be disingenuous to imply this process was not without controversy. in 2004, when this commission recommended that western soma be removed from the eastern neighb
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)